BENEFITS

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ENERGY INDEPENDeNCE

Cape York Renewstable® plants, by taking advantage of the abundant solar resources of Cape York and the Torres Strait, will significantly contribute to the energy independence of the region.

CYR plants will avoid the usage of 8.2 million litres of diesel each year representing 11.5 million AUD savings.

CYR plants will produce electricity locally, to be stored and consumed locally.

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JOBS AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER

CYR construction will create 130 jobs and 35 jobs (direct and indirect) during operation. Local people will be trained to operate in this high potential renewable and hydrogen industry.

CYR will put Cape York and the Torres Strait at the forefront of the hydrogen innovation in Australia with the implementation of a bankable project delivering clean power, much needed to achieve a grid-friendly penetration of renewables.

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clean AND STABLE ELECTRICITy

CYR does not emit any greenhouse or polluting gas, its hydrogen storage runs on the water cycle and only emits pure water steam.

It will provide power for 6,300 people with clean and stable electricity 24/7 but also with scope for growth far beyond the current diesel system. CYR will avoid 22,200 tons of local CO2 emissions per year.

After at least 25 to 30 years of operation, the solar panels and the hydrogen storage technology will be repowered or recycled.

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RESILIENCy

CYR plants will be built in compliance with international standards to withstand extreme weather conditions. Solar will be built using the best technology and tailored to the region conditions. Additionally, all the energy storage elements will be containerised, making them easily scalable.

CYR plants will be self-sufficient, they will sustain the grid stability and thanks to their Energy Management Systems, they will be able to work in Island Mode.

The Renewstable plant is a flexible asset which can integrate services such as:

  • Black start

  • Voltage support

  • Reactive compensation

  • Frequency regulation